Tottenham the only ‘big six’ team to significantly increase season ticket prices over the last 10 years

18 March 2019

Tottenham new stadium
Photo: Getty Images Spurs have just announced they are freezing their season ticket prices for the 2019/20 season - the first in their new state-of-the-art stadium.

Tottenham announces they are freezing season ticket prices. But Hotspur fans have to look with envy at their ‘big six’ rivals regarding season ticket prices. 

Tottenham are the only club to have increased prices by a double-digit percentage since 2009.

Tottenham are the only Premier League ‘big six’ club to have increased season ticket prices by a significant margin over the last 10 years.

Spurs have just announced they are freezing their season ticket prices for the 2019/20 season - the first in their new state-of-the-art stadium.

But offthepitch.com research has found the club are the only big-six club to have increased prices for the cheapest season tickets - adult tickets outside family areas - by a double-digit percentage since 2009.

Spurs have increased prices from £650 in 2009/10 to £795 - a £145 increase, the equivalent of a 22% price hike.

Chelsea have put up their prices by 8% since 2009 - a £55 rise from £695 to £750.

Three have reduced the price

Manchester United have raised their cheapest season tickets once in the last 10 years, putting up their cheapest season ticket price from £513 to £532 in 2010/11 - the price has been frozen since.

Three of the Premier League’s big six have reduced the price of their entry-level adult season tickets during this period.

Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City have all reduced the prices of their adult entry-level season ticket prices since 2009.

Manchester City have lowered their cheapest adult season ticket price by £110, from £420 in 2009/10 to £310 in 2018/19 - a reduction of 26%.

Liverpool have knocked £47 off the price of their equivalent season ticket, with the cost falling from £732 to £685 this season, representing a fall of six per cent.

Arsenal have knocked £2 off their lowest-priced season ticket over the last 10 years, with the price falling from £893 to £891. 

 

However the Gunners’ cheapest season ticket prices have remained the most expensive every year since 2009 and are currently priced at £96 more than the second most expensive equivalent this season (Spurs, £795).

Reduced prices indicate the bigger clubs have reacted to the negative PR generated from protests over prices. Arsenal and Liverpool fans are among those to have protested in recent years.

The ticket price falls at Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City also illustrate how match-day revenues have receded in importance to the Premier League big guns, as TV and commercial revenues have continued to increase.

Big-six TV revenues have increased by £90million in 10 years, the equivalent of a 180 percent rise.

Huge TV-deals

Manchester City’s record-breaking Premier League title win last season earned them £149.4 million from central funds alone. The money came primarily from the Premier League’s huge TV deals but also includes City’s share of the league’s central commercial income.

All of the big six earned over £140 million last season from TV deals either at home or from overseas - compared to £50 million earned through TV cash and prize money in the 2009/10 season.

In 2009/10, Manchester United earned the highest amount £53 million, while Liverpool earned £48 million - the least of the big six.

Sky and BT Sport have paid a record £5.1 billion for live Premier League TV rights for three seasons from 2016/17 to 2018/19.