Liverpool CEO fears losing football fans to Fortnite

18 March 2019

Peter Moore LIverpool CEO fortnite
Photo: Getty Images Peter Moore, CEO at Liverpool FC, is convinced that clubs need to react if children should be football-fans in the future.

Clubs must actively go out to get younger fans before losing them to video games.

Peter Moore believes the traditional football initiation rite is over.

Nikolaj Babis Nielsen contact@offthepitch.com

Traditionally in English football, supporting a football club was something passed down from father to son. But fathers from all over the world are now facing a new enemy in their efforts to convince offspring to support their favourite football team - social media and video games, according to a report in The Independent.

In his keynote speech at the South by Southwest (SXSW) annual conglomerate of film, interactive media and music festivals in Austin, Texas, Liverpool CEO Peter Moore addressed the modern-day issue of attracting young football fans:

“The next generation (of fans) is going to play Fortnite, or Apex Legends and is he even going to get out of his bedroom? That is the challenge we face,” Moore said.

Video games knowledge

Moore has been head of EA Sports and before that vice president of Microsoft’s interactive entertainment business, so the Liverpool-born CEO knows his way around gamers and young fans.

The ability for me to bring my experience, particularly in the last 20 years being in tech, has allowed me to bring that to bear against the needs and challenges of what traditional sports need to do to embrace this new generation

Being responsible for all business, commercial and operational areas at Liverpool FC, Moore has overhauled the way the club engage their fans, implementing technology and data to get a better understanding of supporters.

“The ability for me to bring my experience, particularly in the last 20 years being in tech, has allowed me to bring that to bear against the needs and challenges of what traditional sports need to do to embrace this new generation,” Moore said.

The rite of passage is finished

Moore recalled his dad taking him to Anfield in 1959 when he was four years old, and the 64-year-old said he has bled Red ever since. But according to Moore, the organic engagement of football fans is not happening anymore.

Instead, his plans are to actively go out and get the young fans and build platforms they find relatable and talk to them as if the club is a video game, since the new generation of fans is more tech-savvy, and demanding different experiences.

To achieve this, Liverpool will add 360-degree cameras at Anfield, so younger fans will experience the game as they are used to seeing it in video games such as FIFA.