China’s new transfer rules may deal blow to international transfer economy

14 January 2020

Mbia # 25 of Wuhan Zall and Arnautovic # 7 of Shanghai SIPG in action during 2019 China Super League at Wuhan Wuhuan Sports Center on July 28, 2019 in Wuhan China.
Photo: Getty Images Last summer West Ham cashed in on their striker Marko Arnautovic when he departed for Chinese football. That scenario is less likely to happen in the future. Pictured is Mbia (25) of Wuhan Zall and Arnautovic (7) of Shanghai SIPG in action during 2019 China Super League at Wuhan Wuhuan Sports Center on July 28, 2019 in Wuhan China.

“If we don't take timely action, I fear it will collapse," says chairman of Chinese FA. Chinese clubs have spent €231million on players from English clubs since 2015.

100 per cent ‘Super tax’ has already slowed down spending on international transfers since 2018.

Days of ordinary players earning extraordinary money may be over.

James Corbett corbett@offthepitch.com

China’s ascendant role in the international transfer economy may be jeopardised by new curbs on spending implemented by the country’s FA.

The move could also have an impact on English clubs, who have received £205million in transfer fees from Chinese teams in the past five years.

China is now ranked sixth among international football spenders and has become football’s most formidable economic force outside of Europe. 

On a per transfer basis, China ranks fourth internationally ($1.309million), spending slightly more than French clubs do on foreign players.

Do you want to read this article?

Get instant access by signing up for a 7-day free trial

No credit card, no commitments and it will expire automatically.

You will receive a link that activates your trial in an email.