Investors are targeting cheap Danish clubs in recognition of country's prominent youth development

25 June 2021

Sonderjyske
Photo: Alamy Uptick in foreign investment in Denmark's first and second tier shows how some local owners no longer have faith in their ability to keep up with football's growing costs.

Uptick in foreign investment in Denmark's first and second tier shows how some local owners no longer have faith in their ability to keep up with football's growing costs.

With cheap entry points, investors see a way to easily recoup their money with just few player sales.

But new owners could create cultural clashes between clubs that have traditionally been in the hands of local businesspeople.

The Danish football association has launched a review into foreign and national ownership to assess whether a type of owners' and directors' test should be implemented.

Off The Pitch examines the often-contentious topic in the intersection of emotion and professionalism.

Emil Gjerding Nielson nielson@offthepitch.com

One of the more unexpected tendencies that emerged in conjunction with the coronavirus pandemic was the influx of foreign investors in Danish football. 

Five clubs in the first and second tier have since August 2020 accepted investment either wholly or in part by international groups, some of whom purport to utilise the multi-club ownership structure that has become increasingly popular.  

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